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Earlier this year, NCALL joined other members of The National Resource Center on Domestic Violence’s (NRCDV) Domestic Violence Awareness Project Advisory Committee (DVAP) in Baltimore to develop a message for Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) 2018 and beyond that represents a unified voice about gender-based violence and its impact on society. That message is #1Thing. There is so much value and power in each person’s #1Thing, when sharing our story. The survivor’s story. The advocate’s story. Each community’s story. The story of the movement to end gender-based violence. The #1Thing message helps us all see how our collective “one things” can help bring about social transformation. To learn more, please visit the DVAP website and download the #1Thing Action Guide with sample social media posts, graphics, and more.

What’s Your #1Thing?

#1Thing is about moving people into action. It inspires thinking about how you, as an individual, can take small steps that leads to real change. What’s your 1 Thing? Consider these conversation starters:

  • #1Thing I want to share about my story
  • As a survivor, #1Thing I need advocates to know
  • #1Thing that has inspired me to work to end gender-based violence
  • #1Thing I want my children to know
  • As a community leader, #1Thing I want to share
  • #1Thing I do to take care of myself
  • #1Thing that impacts my healing & resilience the most
  • #1Thing I wish policy makers knew about gender-based violence & its impact on communities
  • #1Thing my family could do to support my healing

NCALL’s New Educational Resources!

Last year, NCALL unveiled our Abuse in Later Life Education Series for Advocates, 13 instructional video clips aimed at providing information that highlights some of the unique issues experienced by older survivors of abuse. In conjunction with DVAM 2018, we are proud to supplement this education series with seven new modules on the following topics:

  • Support Groups for Older Survivors
  • Powers of Attorney and Guardianship
  • Policies to Enhance Safety for Older Survivors
  • Equity for Older Victims
  • Collaboration
  • Ways to Increase Awareness of Abuse in Later Life
  • Working with Survivors Who Have Guardians

All of these training modules are formatted as videos, each less than 30 minutes in length, and come with a worksheet containing links to additional resources and questions for advocates and programs to consider as they incorporate key content into their practice. Find them on NCALL’s website at: http://www.ncall.us/Advocates-Toolkit/.

 

 

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The NCALL team is excited to announce that Katie Block has joined our staff on October 1 as the new National Resource Center Project Coordinator! Katie brings a vast set of skills and expertise on elder abuse, advocacy, and victim services work. She has a background in social work, public health, and communications, with a focus on developing and supporting victim services programming for older adults. Katie has a deep commitment to the work of building equitable access for older victims that is uniquely aligned with our vision and mission.

At NCALL, Katie will coordinate NCALL’s work with the new National Resource Center for Reaching Victims (NRC) related to older victims of crime. Through comprehensive training and technical assistance, the NRC serves as a one-stop shop where victim service providers, culturally specific organizations, criminal justice professionals, and policymakers may get information and expert guidance to enhance their capacity to identify, reach, and serve all victims, especially those from communities that too often have less access to healing services and avenues to justice. For more information about the NRC, or to contact Katie, please send her an email at: kblock@ncall.us.

Please join us in welcoming Katie to the NCALL team and to End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin!

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On this first day of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life (NCALL) celebrates a year of great accomplishments with the domestic violence movement. As the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is set to expire, many across our movement have worked tirelessly toward the Reauthorization of VAWA, which creates critical enhancements to the law and improves how we can respond to domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking across the nation.

At NCALL, we are proud to elevate the voices of older survivors of domestic violence in this celebration. This month, NCALL welcomes a new class of grantees of the Office on Violence Against Women’s Abuse in Later Life grant program. These grantees will be working in their communities to educate professionals working with older survivors, to provide direct services to older survivors, and to enhance a coordinated community response to abuse in later life.

Also this month, NCALL is releasing several new modules in our Abuse in Later Life Education Series for Advocates. These training modules are designed to enhance responses by community-based domestic violence and sexual assault agency staff and volunteers to the unique needs of older survivors. We are also a proud partner in the Office for Victims of Crime’s new National Resource Center on Serving Victims (NRC). The NRC is a one-stop shop for the crime victims’ field to access training and technical assistance and enhance victim services to underserved victims of crime, including older victims.

Finally, NCALL is glad to continue to participate in the National Center on Elder Abuse’s Advisory Board where we work in partnership with various experts in the elder abuse field to make certain that older adults live with dignity and respect and free from harm. For more information about NCALL’s work, please visit our website at: www.ncall.us.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month is not only an opportunity for our movement to take stock of and reflect on what we have achieved, it is also an opportunity to ponder anew what we have yet to do to fully realize our aims as an anti-violence movement.

Specifically, it is important for us to consider whether our stated values of inclusion, respect, and social justice are true for all who work in our movement and for each survivor, especially survivors at the margins of our work. For many at the margins, issues of oppression and marginalization within our movement create challenges and barriers to healing and accessing justice. These issues are real and they demand our attention because what is happening to those at the edges of our work is also happening to “us”.

As we move into Domestic Violence Awareness Month and further into our work as a movement, we must deeply consider these challenges and what they mean for our moral identity and for our place as leaders in the struggle for a more just society. If we are able to do critical work to address these issues, we will become more capable of being who we aim to be, and that too will be worth celebrating.

Juanita Davis

Juanita Davis, J.D., is a Program Manager for the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life.

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