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Announcing the Fall 2017 National Institute on the Prosecution of Elder Abuse

Co-sponsored by the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life, the Office on Violence Against Women, and AEquitas

New Orleans, LA

November 7-10, 2017

The National Institute on the Prosecution of Elder Abuse (NIPEA) is a three-and-one-half-day course designed to challenge prosecutors to reevaluate their approach to prosecuting elder abuse cases. Participants receive training on the dynamics of elder abuse as well as practical skills to successfully prosecute these cases. NIPEA explores the complex issues faced by prosecutors -- balancing offender accountability with the impact of criminal prosecution on victims. In addition to case evaluation and litigation skills, the curriculum examines the benefits of developing a coordinated, victim-centered community response; explains common injuries and relevant medical evidence, providing guidance on the use of medical experts; explores ethical issues confronted by prosecutors; addresses the development and improvement of culturally-specific victim services; and offers prosecutors the ability to redefine outcomes and the very nature of justice in elder abuse cases.

NIPEA will take place at the DoubleTree by Hilton in New Orleans, Louisiana. Fifty-four (54) slots are available. There is no tuition fee for the institute.  Attendees may qualify for approximately twenty (20) continuing legal education credit hours including at least one (1) hour of ethics credit.

Preference will be given to prosecutor offices participating in the OVW Enhanced Training and Services to End Violence Against and Abuse of Women Later in Life Program (or prosecutor offices which are partnered with organizations that receive such funds). All other applicants/prosecutors will be considered in the order in which they apply. 

Interested prosecutors may apply to attend NIPEA by completing the survey here. Submission of an application does not guarantee a spot in the Institute; please DO NOT make travel arrangements unless and until you have been notified that you are accepted for the course. If you need assistance completing this survey, please contact Nina Reynolds at 608-237-3454 or nreynolds@ncall.us.

Registration will continue until the event reaches capacity.

Participant comments from past institutes highlight the practical value and outstanding quality of this program:

  • "This has been the best training/series of trainings. Inspiring, substantive, well organized. I feel so grateful to be exposed to it. Thank you for doing these trainings. Amazing."

  • "Fantastic training. [ . . . ] Already motivated to go home and dig in!”

  • “Good job with case studies. Very practical. As a former educator, I recognize and appreciate the variety of teaching strategies you used.”

Please contact Ann Laatsch at alaatsch@ncall.us for more information about this program.

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One in ten older adults are abused each year. Some of these older victims are in dangerous situations and need a temporary place to live or new permanent housing. Yet, many shelters and transitional housing programs are ill-equipped to meet the unique needs of older survivors.

To better understand and address the needs of older adults in crises, in 2016, the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life (NCALL) facilitated a Roundtable on Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing for Victims of Abuse in Later Life. The Roundtable was jointly hosted by the U.S. Department of Justice, through the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, through the Administration for Community Living (ACL), and the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program (FVPSA).

The Roundtable participants were a select group of experts in the elder abuse and domestic violence fields, including: four older survivors who had utilized emergency shelters and transitional housing; nine local victim service providers; two representatives from state domestic violence coalitions; eight national OVW funded technical assistance providers; and, more than a dozen policy and program specialists representing federal agencies responsible for administering victim services. Each of these perspectives revealed critical insights on how older survivors perceive and receive various types of victim services, and how advocates at local, state, and national levels can improve the available options.

We are pleased to share a new article, authored by Bonnie Brandl, Cailin Crockett, and Juanita Davis, that reveals the lessons learned from the testimonies of the survivors, advocates and experts at the Roundtable, summarizes the Roundtable’s overarching themes, and offers recommendations for programmatic responses to better serve older adults experiencing abuse, so they may find a safe place to heal, and ultimately, to thrive.

 

 

 

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